The Arden Encyclopedia of Shakespeare's Language

Fr. 625.00
ISBN: 978-1-350-01795-5
+ -
The Encyclopedia of Shakespeare's Language is a two-volume encyclopedia offering the first comprehensive account of Shakespeare's language to use computational methods derived from corpus linguistics - methods of choice for today's lexicographer. Volume 1 is a dictionary from A-M, focussing on the use and meanings of Shakespeare's words, both in the context of what he wrote and in the context in which he wrote. Every word is compared with a 321 million word corpus comprising the work of Shakespeare's contemporaries. The volume establishes in detail both what is unique about Shakespeare's language and what Shakespeare's language meant to his contemporaries, including, for example, their attitudes towards love or death, what it meant to be Welsh or a harlot, or even the significance of eating fish as opposed to beef. Volume 2 is a dictionary from N-Z. As with the first volume, internal comparisons reveal how Shakespeare's language varies dynamically across his works. These show, for example, whether certain words are peculiar to tragedies, comedies or histories, and/or to certain social groups, such as people of high or low social rank, men or women, and they show the stylistic flavour of words, for example whether a word is literary or colloquial.
The Encyclopedia of Shakespeare's Language is a two-volume encyclopedia offering the first comprehensive account of Shakespeare's language to use computational methods derived from corpus linguistics - methods of choice for today's lexicographer. Volume 1 is a dictionary from A-M, focussing on the use and meanings of Shakespeare's words, both in the context of what he wrote and in the context in which he wrote. Every word is compared with a 321 million word corpus comprising the work of Shakespeare's contemporaries. The volume establishes in detail both what is unique about Shakespeare's language and what Shakespeare's language meant to his contemporaries, including, for example, their attitudes towards love or death, what it meant to be Welsh or a harlot, or even the significance of eating fish as opposed to beef. Volume 2 is a dictionary from N-Z. As with the first volume, internal comparisons reveal how Shakespeare's language varies dynamically across his works. These show, for example, whether certain words are peculiar to tragedies, comedies or histories, and/or to certain social groups, such as people of high or low social rank, men or women, and they show the stylistic flavour of words, for example whether a word is literary or colloquial.
Autor Culpeper, Jonathan / Hardie, Andrew / Demmen, Jane / Culpeper, Jonathan (Reihe Hrsg.)
Verlag Bloomsbury Academic
Einband Fester Einband
Erscheinungsjahr 2023
Lieferstatus Noch nicht erschienen, Juni 2023
Ausgabekennzeichen Englisch
Masse 2 Bde.
Coverlag The Arden Shakespeare (Imprint/Brand)
Reihe Arden Encyclopedia of Shakespeare's Language

Über den Autor Culpeper, Jonathan

Jonathan Culpeper is Professor of English Language and Linguistics in the Department of Linguistics and English Language at Lancaster University, UK. Spanning pragmatics, stylistics and the history of English, his major publications include Early Modern English Dialogues: Spoken Interaction as Writing (2010, CUP; co-authored with Merja Kytö), Impoliteness: Using Language to Cause Offence (2011, CUP), and most recently Pragmatics and the English Language (2014, Palgrave; with Michael Haugh). He is currently leading the AHRC-funded Encyclopaedia of Shakespeare's Language project, which will provide evidence-based and contextualised accounts of Shakespeare's language. Paul Kerswill is Professor of Sociolinguistics at the University of York. His research has focused on migration and dialect contact in both Norway and Britain, including Bergen and the New Town of Milton Keynes. He has worked on projects on the emergence of Multicultural London English. His publications include work on the role of children in language change, the phonology of new dialects and the representation of youth language in the media. He has co-edited Dialect Change: Convergence and Divergence in European Languages (with Frans Hinskens and Peter Auer, 2005) and The Sage Handbook of Sociolinguistics (with Ruth Wodak and Barbara Johnstone, 2010). Ruth Wodak is Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Discourse Studies at Lancaster University, UK, and affiliated to the University of Vienna. Besides various other prizes, she was awarded the Wittgenstein Prize for Elite Researchers in 1996 and an Honorary Doctorate from University of Örebro in Sweden in 2010. She is member of the British Academy of Social Sciences and of the Academia Europaea. Currently, she is PI of a three-year research project on 'The Discursive Construction of Austrian identity - 2015.' (http://nationale-identitaet-2015.univie.ac.at/) Recent book publications include The Politics of Fear. What Right-wing Populist Discourses Mean (Sage, 2015; translation into the German 2016); The Discourse of Politics in Action: 'Politics as Usual' (Palgrave), revised edition (2011); Migration, Identity and Belonging (with G. Delanty, P. Jones, 2011); The Discursive Construction of History. Remembering the German Wehrmacht's War of Annihilation (with H. Heer, W. Manoschek, A. Pollak, 2008); and The SAGE Handbook of Sociolinguistics (with Barbara Johnstone and Paul Kerswill, 2010). Tony McEnery is Distinguished Professor of English Language and Linguistics at Lancaster University. His research interests include English corpus linguistics as well as corpus linguistics applied to languages other than English. He has wide experience of editing and authoring, and is currently editor of the book series Advances in Corpus Linguistics (Routledge). His books include Corpus Linguistics: Method, Theory and Practice (with Andrew Hardie, CUP, 2011) and Discourse Analysis and Media Attitudes (With Paul Baker and Costas Gabrielatos, CUP, 2013). Francis Katamba is Emeritus Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Linguistics and English Language at the University of Lancaster, UK. His research interests are in the areas of phonology and morphology. His publications include An Introduction to Phonology (1989), Morphology: Critical Concepts in Linguistics (2004), English Words (2nd edition, 2005), Morphology (2nd edition with John Stonham, 2006) and Contemporary Linguistics: An Introduction (2nd edition, with William O'Grady and John Archibald, 2011).

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